Portfolio

 

Interdisciplinary Work

 

Alba

Making the sun shine in a rather tumultuous time. This work was started during an ice storm. The back of vessel is a dark blue. 

woven glass, leather 19.5 x 4.5" 

 

 

 

       

       

Caminante - Putting the right foot forward - anxiety manifested, anxiety contained

Does struggle, drastic change and/or adversity make us more resilient? Is it true that what doesn't kill us makes us stronger? Does the age of when someone experiences these events matter? Anxiety can be a common feeling that everyone experiences at some point in their lives in response to a stressful emotional situation.  Children often manifest anxiety when faced with a life changing event such as moving to a new place. However, at a young age they are so resilient that they overcome such obstacles by finding outlets such as reading, art, sports, music, family, pets, etc. Nevertheless, it is always reassuring to anyone enduring a life changing experience that they are not alone.  It is reassuring to know that our lives are interconnected, that we often share similar struggles and we are capable of finding purpose, passion, and hope through adversity. Lastly, we share a common goal of making this journey life a happy and fruitful one.

Artist Note: When I moved to the states from Peru I was 10 years old and my senses were on overdrive as I was trying to learn a new language and get to know a new culture. Somewhere along the first months of living in the states, I had heard the expression that if you start your day with the right foot you will have a great day. So my way of assimilating to this new life and new language I decided to take this statement literally instead of figuratively and I clutched to this expression and made it my shield to survive my new life.  I had become to be very anxious on school days and and through this ritual is how I assimilated my anxiety. This ritual became my lucky charm and my shield to confront my anxiety on school days. The school environment, the language barrier, feelings of inadequacy were the causes of my anxiety. If I accidentally put my left foot first I would go back and lay back on my bed and start over again. This ritual became almost like a chore until I gradually exchanged it for books and drawing. My goal is to indefinitely collect right footprints and to connect them with a red silk cord, signifying that all our lives are interconnected.  The red silk cord represents our humanity, that we are all fragile, we are not invincible, nor invisible, that it’s OK to struggle because as humans we are capable of finding outlets and solutions to our problems and we are resilient with the ability to cope most obstacles. The items on the desk represents our positive outlets, how we are capable of successfully containing anxiety in a positive manner by leisurely enjoying books, music, drawing, etc. 

Would you like for your footprint to be part of this continuing installation?

Please read statement below to see if you meet the criteria.

Contributors may be anyone who has ever moved as a "child" to a different "country" than where you were born in. "Child" can be also considered a state of mind not necessarily under 18 years of age. "Country" could also be a state of perception, for instance for many young kids when moving just around the corner is like moving to a different country. I would like for you to grab a piece of loose leaf paper and outline/draw/print/paint your right footprint on it. Also write your name if you would like and the place(s) where you moved to and from and with a date/year and/or age if you remember it. If accidentally you print your left foot on the paper that's fine, if you print both that's fine too, I want to know what was your first instinct. If you would like to participate simply pin your creation behind this announcement, I will be picking up creations regularly. I will keep your creation unless you really want me to mail it back once I've exhibited the installation. Thank you so much for willing to help me with this project! This installation was exhibited for the 1st time on September 13th 2016, however I will be receiving footprints indefinitely. You may scan and email your right footprint to perla@perlasegovia.com or contact me if you rather snail mail it. 

Site specific installation, University of Arizona

Collection of right foot imprints/drawings, silk cord, student desk, welcome mat, silk cord, various books

 

 

 

 

Divergent

Research shows that divergent thinking (looking for ideas from outside your discipline, considering a problem from a new angle) is critical for tackling problems that have no easy or clear solution. Sometimes society imposes fictional protocols on how to live one's life and we often follow blindly without challenging these ideas. The purpose of this work is to raise awareness about the importance of thinking "outside the box". 

woven, kiln-formed glass, 19.5 x 4.5"

 



 

 Dune Marsh Gateway

woven kiln-glass, 15" x 5" x 2"

 

 

 

 

Finding Balance

poplar, glass, fine silver, 36 x 12 x 6"

 

 

 

gateway-of-courage.jpg

 

 

Gateway of Courage

This work is in honor of mothers who face the most impossible of situations. Immigrant mothers escaping conflict to save their child. Single moms, who work twice as hard so their kids feel complete. Mothers battling illness so they can live to see their children grow, et cetera. These women while facing different adversities are interconnected by the threads of humanity and determination in the gateway of courage.

"Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, while loving someone deeply gives you courage."

Lao Tzu

Kilnformed glass, cotton, aluminum, poplar - 12 x 24 x 36"

 

 

 


Hope 2017

One of our most important human traits is having the ability to hope. To be able to think ahead in an optimistic manner about our future, both earthly and spiritual, is to many of us the main essence that keeps up striving. Throughout our lives our hope is challenged, shaken, and sometimes even exhausted.  I chose to make this piece because my hope has been repeatedly bombarded and defied this year. Humanity is at a crossroads and in my opinion hope’s driving force is the key to overcome most obstacles. If hope is not kept alive there is no light and darkness will take over. However, hope is not enough being aware of the origin of our tribulations is imperative. Most of the origins of the difficulties in our modern world are based on the lack of empathy for fellow humans, because of greed, because of racism, hate, weapons, disease, poverty, climate change and the denial of it. This indifference is the cancer of modern society. Furthermore, I believe it is imperative to be informed of the causes of evil because having an informed grasp of reality will enable us to have real hope, not a false distorted one.

I have chosen to represent the hope scenario of this year’s tribulations by reproducing Pandora’s Box opening. I used a mason jar to hold a replica of a baby girl because children are my hope and partial heirs of earth. The evils of the world are represented by an indifferent narcissistic woman, a racist gun fanatic, a greedy businessman, a woman fighting climate change, and a poor sick man. I chose the mason jar for three reasons, first the definition of jar was lost in translation and Pandora opened a jar not a box. Secondly, it represents the US the country that gave my family and I hope when we needed it, mason jars were invented and patented in the US. Third, they are meant to preserve and because of their glass nature they are fragile yet they still let light in, just like hope.

3D printed Z-ABS, Z-ULTRAT, stainless steel blade, glass mason jar

3 x 3 x 3'



 

 

           

 

intheirshoes.jpeg

In Their Shoes

Human beings have migrated since time immemorial, during times of borderless and fenceless territories. Some would say that migration is one of the most fundamental human rights. According to the United Nations, 65.6 million people around the world were forced from their homes in 2016 due to war, natural disasters and persecution. Most immigrants’ decision to immigrate is not made on a whim, after all they often leave everything they know and love behind, such as their homes, families and communities. These decisions are made because of dire need and most of the time they have to be made quickly and abruptly. However, we currently live during times where there is political divisiveness and sentiments of anti-immigrant nationalism are high. In contrast, compassion and empathy are at an extreme low.  As migration will most likely continue to increase it is important to bring awareness, empathy and discernment to the plight of hundreds of thousands of people that are escaping unceasingly dangerous situations.

I have chosen to replicate immigrants’ memories of their homeland using freehand machine embroidery to reflect the abrupt and quick decision making many immigrants have to make. I have asked for immigrants to share their favorite photographs of themselves in their homeland and have embroidered a version of these photographs onto canvas remnants.  The hasty action of quickly embroidering someone’s memories without previously tracing on the fabric forms an interconnection with myself and the immigrant. The combination of quickly sketching someone else’s memories and the loud sewing machine noise also ads a sense of urgency, reflects the brusque manner in which immigrants often have to leave their homes and gives me the responsibility to record their precious memories. Despite the complex assortment of legal, social, emotional and physical challenges, increasing numbers of people still trade the risks for the chance of safer, better lives for themselves and their families. It is important to acknowledge their hope and the dignity, dreams and sacrifices. The embroidery was made on unbleached canvas scraps. This utilitarian simple weave fabric is reflective of immigrants’ often common human traits of strength, resilience and desire to be a productive member of society. The navy blue cotton thread is a symbol of strenuous hope.  Even though people are bombarded with hardships only the ones that keep a sliver of hope will have a better chance of surpassing these tribulations. In other words, hope is their lifeline. Design elements such as the shoes and suitcase are also created with canvas, and navy blue thread to create cohesiveness throughout the project. The red silk cord represents humanity, how all of our lives are interconnected, how we share universal human experiences, and how in unity we are stronger. Silk after all is the strongest natural fiber when dry but loses 20% of its strength when wet. The use of barb wire reflects the fences or territories and the obstacles immigrants face when they decide to leave their homeland and how they feel contained as if they were farm animals. Furthermore, the barb wire, suitcase, shoes, welcome mat with bird spikes represent the struggles of flight, the immigration process, violence, the asylum or lack of it, hostility in host country, assimilation, and the perception of being other within a new culture. All elements are displayed in a continuous circular manner to represent immigration as an infinite, continuous cycle and to communicate the concept of an all-inclusive society.

I would like for this project to strengthen understanding, to stimulate greater compassion and advocacy between displaced people and the communities that receive them by bringing to light the immigrants’ plight and weave it into the fabric of the viewer in hopes they will gain insight into the lives of immigrants. Whether instigated by war, conflict, persecution, poverty or climate change, millions of immigrants are transported from the known into the unknown. Their main desire is to keep their families safe and to be able to reclaim a life of dignity and be productive members of society. Yet there are still so many people that are indifferent to their plight. Indifference certainly deteriorates unity and strengthens sentiments of racial and cultural superiority. We are often in the position to help by the very minimal to express support of immigrants. Is it our moral responsibility to help? If it is in within our desire to help, where do we start? A good first step would be to imagine ourselves in their shoes, think of what would we do in their situation and start a dialogue.

Nota bene: This will be an ongoing project in which I will be accepting photographs from immigrants in their homeland indefinitely for future installations. If you would like to participate please send an email with the photograph you would like to share to perlasegovia@perlasegovia.com with the word "immigrant" on subject line.

Media: natural canvas, cotton thread

Size: 16'+

 

 

 

  

Inca Prophecy I

There is an Inca prophecy that says that when the eagle of the North and the condor of the South fly together, the Earth will awaken.

Are we currently living this prophecy? Are prophecies even real? Our Native American brothers and sisters of the north were recently reunited with natives from all over the world in support of their activism against oil pipelines. There is no denying that our earth is going through dire change.  Maybe this is the dire change needed to wake up humanity and force it to join their efforts into saving our one and only home.

red terra cotta clay, 10 x 10 x 18"

 

 

 


Inca Prophecy II

There is an Inca prophecy that says that when the eagle of the North and the condor of the South fly together, the Earth will awaken.

Are we currently living this prophecy? Are prophecies even real? Our Native American brothers and sisters of the north were recently reunited with natives from all over the world in support of their activism against oil pipelines. There is no denying that our earth is going through dire change.  Maybe this is the dire change needed to wake up humanity and force it to join their efforts into saving our one and only home.

red terra cotta clay, majolica 12 x 10 x 10"

 

 

 


 

Immigrant's Void

Human beings have migrated since time immemorial, during times of borderless and fenceless territories. Some would say that migration is one of the most fundamental human rights. According to the United Nations, 65.6 million people around the world were forced from their homes in 2016 due to war, natural disasters and persecution. Most immigrants’ decision to immigrate is not made on a whim, after all they often leave everything they know and love behind, such as their homes, families and communities. These decisions are made because of dire need and most of the time they have to be made quickly and abruptly. However, we currently live during times where there is political divisiveness and sentiments of anti-immigrant nationalism are high. In contrast, compassion and empathy towards immigrants are at an extreme low and it is important to bring awareness, empathy and discernment to the plight of hundreds of thousands of people that are escaping unceasingly dangerous situations.

I have chosen to replicate immigrants’ memories of their homeland using freehand machine embroidery onto canvas to reflect the abrupt and quick decision making many immigrants have to make. Since I am an immigrant, I have started with my favorite photographs of myself surrounded by family and friends in my homeland. The combination of sketching someone’s memories and the loud sewing machine noise ads a sense of urgency, reflects the brusque manner in which immigrants often have to leave their homes and gives me the responsibility to record precious memories. Despite the complex assortment of legal, social, emotional and physical challenges, increasing numbers of people still trade the risks for the chance of safer, better lives for themselves and their families. It is important to acknowledge their hope and the dignity, dreams and sacrifices. The embroidery was made on unbleached canvas. This utilitarian simple weave fabric is reflective of immigrants’ often common human traits of strength, resilience and desire to be a productive member of society. The navy blue cotton thread is a symbol of strenuous hope.  Even though people are bombarded with hardships only the ones that keep a sliver of hope will have a better chance of surpassing these tribulations. In other words, hope is their lifeline. I have chosen to omit painting the immigrants in the picture to reflect the vast void, emptiness and even loneliness one feels when leaving their home not knowing if they’ll ever go back.

I would like for this project to strengthen understanding, to stimulate greater compassion and advocacy between displaced people and the communities that receive them by bringing to light the immigrants’ plight and insight into the lives of immigrants. Whether instigated by war, conflict, persecution, poverty or climate change, millions of immigrants are transported from the known into the unknown. Their main desire is to keep their families safe and to be able to reclaim a life of dignity and be productive members of society. Yet there are still so many people that are indifferent to their plight. Indifference certainly deteriorates unity and strengthens sentiments of racial and cultural superiority. We are often in the position to help at the very minimum to express support of immigrants. Is it our moral responsibility to help? If it is in within our desire to help, where do we start? A good first step would be to imagine ourselves in their shoes, think of what would we do in their situation and start a dialogue.

Nota bene: This will be an ongoing project in which I will be accepting photographs from immigrants in their homeland indefinitely for future installations. If you would like to participate please send an email with the photograph you would like to share to perlasegovia@perlasegovia.com with the word "immigrant" on subject line.

Media: natural canvas, cotton thread, appliqué fabrics, watercolor

Dimensions: 37.5 x 41"

 

 

 


Nine

woven kiln-glass, 18 x 29"

 

 

 

 

Pacifico

woven kiln-glass, 18 x 6.5"

 

 

 

Primigravida

Creating awareness about the many pressures and obstacles society places upon new mothers is the purpose of this work. Isn't being a new mom supposed to be the most beautiful experience in the world? Isn't it supposed to be the happiest time in a mother’s life? While there's no doubt that giving birth and meeting your baby is one of the most special and amazing times in a woman's life, society’s claim of it being a purely blissful moment is not always true. Often new mothers are faced with many prevalent obstacles such as postpartum depression, harassment when breastfeeding in public, the lack of improvements to parental leave, limited availability of reputable and affordable childcare, etc. These hindrances can especially affect first-time moms, who have just been through the birth process. A process, which is both painful and exhausting, manual not included, and they have just been handed a brand-new fragile baby to take care of.  Mothers are not in pure bliss when they have had experiences such as a traumatic birth, difficulty breastfeeding, sleep deprivation, very little or non at all social support at home. This maternal experience of many new mothers has been embodied in a life sized supine figure of a pregnant woman within a pupal insect stage. It has been placed in a natural Arizona setting reflecting the area’s arid and adverse environment. The pupal form has been constructed in part with fabric that has bright colored stripes going in vertical and horizontal directions. The shroud’s blue color represents hope, the orange radiates warmth and happiness, and the purple represents pain. The stripes within the fabric represent the high levels of hormones during pregnancy. These levels are higher than they will ever be at any other time in a woman's life, and after delivery of the baby and the placenta, they plummet. This neurobiological process triggers what is known as the baby blues. Unfortunately, there's societal pressure to feel happy and blissful, immediately after pregnancy so women find it very difficult to talk about the baby blues which if not addressed may lead to postpartum depression. There's enormous guilt and shame some women feel as a result of this experience and as a result women feel alone. Adding a cage like structure surrounding the shrouded pupa will represent these feelings. This cage structure is directly inspired from the cage of the Moths of the Cyana genus, who pupate in a constructed cage woven from the caterpillar's hairs or spines.

Site specific installation, University of Arizona, Campus Farm, facing milking parlor

Steel, circular knit fabric

6 x 5 x 4'

 

 

 

 

Proud Neanderthal Descendants 

This work challenges the idea that Neanderthals had no culture, were not intelligent, and had no fine motor skills. Research has shown that this idea is false. This erroneous stereotype is a reflection of how our modern society has the predisposition to judge groups of people at a whim, and most of the time in a negative way. These groups of people are often marginalized members of society, immigrants, lgbtq, people of color, etc. Portrayed is a woman of color crouching down as if protecting her son under a gateway arch of hope. The snakes, which are often misjudged animals in this case are a symbol of change since they shed their skin and also a symbol of protection.

white clay, terra sigillata, black cobalt oxide, 22 x 20 x 9"

 

 

 



Santos

From time immemorial humans have found their way to worship objects or beings. I understand that the constant repetition of worshipping anything inculcates sentimental attachment and in return trust and faith. This work is about my idea of the modern world’s most idiosyncratic idols and a futuristic representation of what happens when blind trust is involved. Why do humans even feel the need to worship? Is it part of the human condition? Is it a necessity when we are in need of something? I think it is safe to say that worshipping has been alive since when humans realized self worth and became aware of their surroundings and were introduced to the abstracts such as fear and hope.

In this project I’ve created a series of unconventional saints. These saints are your present day Jane and John Doe were over the years they have become idols of worship. They are worshiped for their vanity, indifference, resilience to climate change, their greed, unfaltering hate and support of guns, and even worshiped to keep poverty and illness away as if science and economy trends are irrelevant. I am a born and raised (non-practicing) Catholic of Inca descent, worship of the familiar and the unknown has been sewn with a gold thread into my genetics for millennia. Yet life experiences have led me to realize that I can use a seam ripper and make and break my own stitches. I was raised to not question what the priest said and to trust the church’s teachings blindly.  As an adult I have detached myself from many of those constraints and have allowed myself more leeway. I say many not all because as I write this, I can’t help but think of how others might think this work is sacrilegious. Also, I still find myself praying to Saint Michael the Archangel to defend us in battle and to Saint Francis to make me a channel of his peace and love. My intentions are not of disrespect but to bring awareness to the true intentions of one’s worship, is it greedy, is it self serving, is it misguided by others’ motives. I’m sure not always for I know it often brings comfort. The origin of these photographs are of a Catholic Church who during the Spanish viceroy imposed their beliefs on the local indigenous people. 

Digital composite - digital sculpture and digital photography

 

 

 

 

Sea Turtles Nest Excavation

Every summer my family and I go to watch sea turtles hatch at Wrightsville Beach in North Carolina. The Wrightsville Beach Sea Turtle Project is in charge of this hatching project whose purpose is to facilitate and promote the protection and preservation of sea turtle populations and habitats.  Of the seven extant species of sea turtles, six in the family Cheloniidae and one in the family Dermochelyidae, all are listed on the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species as either "endangered" or "critically endangered". Although sea turtles usually lay around one hundred eggs at a time, on average only one of the eggs from the nest will survive to adulthood. While many of the things that endanger these hatchlings are natural, such as predators including sharks, raccoons, foxes, and seagulls, many new threats to the sea turtle species have recently arrived and increased with the ever-growing presence of humans. For centuries people have regarded oceans as an inexhaustible supply of food, a useful transport route, and a convenient dumping ground and simply too vast to be affected by anything humans do. However, human activity, has finally pushed oceans to their limit. Our oceans, the largest living spaces on earth, are much more fragile and complex than we once thought, and they are fast deteriorating because they are overfished, polluted, taken for granted, carelessly abused and destroyed. Furthermore, this doesn’t just threaten marine habitats and species but also our own health, way of life, and security.

I have always been passionate about creating awareness about the importance of marine life conservation. By creating this mixed media installation I would like to bring focus to the dangers facing sea life by focusing on the journey embarked by the newly born sea turtles which we see every summer taking their first swim into the ocean at Wrightsville Beach. I hope that through this installation a dialogue could be started in our community about the many threats to sea life, threats such as pollution, illegal poaching and climate change.

soldate 60, terra sigillata, copper black oxide, video

 

 

 

 

Strength & Perseverance

Being self-conscious of my body weight has been a constant presence in my life since the day I realized people perceived me to be overweight.  I came to this realization when I was 8 years old and overheard a conversation in which my weight was being discussed as a concern. Until that moment, it had never crossed my mind that my body was not was it was supposed to be. Since that moment I have struggled with my weight and with feelings of body inadequacy. I often have vivid dreams of being overweight. However, I have come to accept the idea that what is most valuable to me is my health and not my appearance; my health has everything to do with how I treat my body, rather than the size of my body. I would like to reflect upon these ideas through a series of steel silhouettes of a large sized woman doing yoga. Furthermore, the intention of this project is to reflect women’s unceasing strength and perseverance regardless of the continuous self-deprecating feelings many women experience because of fictional protocol imposed upon them as to how a woman’s body should be. 

Steel

5.5 x 5.5', 4 x 4', 5 x 5'

 

 

 

 

 

Sol

woven kiln-glass, cotton fabric, 4 x 13 x 13"

 

 

 


Temistocle y su Madre 

Temistocle, introducing himself and his mother to society. Themis, his mother, is the Greek goddess of divine law - the primal, unwritten laws governing human conduct, order, and social control. He represents playfulness, and the fragility of children's sincerity and tolerance.

woven kiln-glass, wood chair frame, 37 x 22 x 36", 26 x 14 x 27"

 

 

 


The Ocean’s Gateway

The world we live in while wondrous can be equally dangerous in respect of its nature and man’s fabrications. We currently live in a world where many of us are isolated from terrible situations and where many people are forced to make impossible choices every day because of tumultuous situations, situations where many choose hope and venture into the vast ocean because is safer than staying home. Sometimes people are forced to cross the vast ocean because it’s much safer than staying home. The people that are isolated from these situations often become desensitized after seeing terrible news over and over through a screen. With this project I would like for the viewer to leave their secure reality and put themselves in the refugees’ shoes, in the shoes of the natural disaster stricken family, and all of those people that has been displaced because of events that are out of their control. Furthermore, I would like to make their situations more intimate to the viewer by bringing attention to the small opening within the glass wave. This small opening reflects the small amount of time that these decisions often need to be made in. Making a decision of whether to stay or leave often has the urgency of needing for it to be done on a limited amount of time, for if you don’t make one quickly one might be made for you. With this small opening I would also like to reflect the feeling of self deprecation or feeling of insignificance often people face when going through these situations. Presently, we are living through some tumultuous times and there are many reasons why people would escape their homes, the more pronounced reasons in our current world are because of political unrest or even natural disasters.  What would you choose when faced with an impossible decision? For instance, deciding whether to stay in your native country that is being bombarded or escaping into the vast ocean via a simple boat? Do you stay or do you leave? Who comes with you? Who stays behind? Do you choose hope? The hope woven in our human nature.

Kilnformed, woven glass, stainless steel

22.5 x 8.75 x 9.5



 


Water is Life - Mni Wiconi

A representation of a earth being engulfed by broken oil pipelines. The Lakota phrase "Mni Wiconi," meaning “Water is Life,” has been an inspiration for water protectors since early on in their stand against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

recycled clay, terra sigillata, cotton fabric, 11”